Chef’s Log 43: Pro-Fusion of Flavours

Chicken stuffed with Goan Chorizo

Chicken stuffed with Goan Chorizo

Fusion cuisine is always risky. One tiny hint of the wrong flavour and the whole dish is a disaster. On the other hand, if you get it right, it can be simply magical. The chefs at The Black Sheep Bistro in Panjim are certifiable magicians. I tried the Chicken stuffed with Goan Chorizo. Unlike the previous samples of Goan sausage that I have tasted, the stuffing here was not overwhelmingly spicy, but retained its delightful zesty essence. The juicy, succulent chicken and the grainy minced sausage made for an interesting combination of textures while the savoury and spicy flavours balanced each other out beautifully. The accompanying sweet potato mash complemented the whole thing perfectly and was delicious in itself. I also sampled the veg risotto, which was equally scrumptious. The tangy taste of the mushrooms interacted with the delicately flavoured herbs and the starchy rice to create something which was both complex and delicious. My favourite dish of the night however, was dessert. The deconstructed mango cheesecake was absolutely marvellous. The base was syrupy and slightly crunchy, while the mousse was airy and light yet rich and creamy at the same time. The mint flavour provided a delightful freshness, while a subtle hint of lemon added just the right zing. A truly classy dessert, if I ever encountered one. It was, all in all, a satisfying meal to say the very least. If you’re looking for something to eat that is not just tasty, but a work of art (experimental art), this is definitely the place to go.
http://www.blacksheepbistro.in/

Veg Risotto

Veg Risotto

Deconstructed mango Cheesecake

Deconstructed mango Cheesecake

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Chef’s Log 20: Masterpiece

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Choris Pao

On my home planet, there have been occasions when a particular dish attained such a degree of perfection that it was officially declared a work of art. I myself came quite close to receiving that honour with my triple layered Honeydragon and skunk-apple pie. But let us not dwell on the shady politics that clearly govern my home planet’s cultural cell (Yes, Earth is not the only planet in the universe that’s fraught with corruption). Humph. Anyway, I have already mentioned how impressed I was with Goan cuisine. And now, I believe I have uncovered a true masterpiece- one that would astound any of the so-called culinary artists on Gastronomica. Not since the invention of the hamburger (I’m still a little unfamiliar with Earth history, but I assume that happened first) has the simple combination of meat and bread been capable of causing such intense joy. The vaguely titled ‘sausage bread’ is truly a class apart. It consists of the famously pungent Goan pork sausage stuffed into traditional Goan bread or ‘pao’. The soft fluffy bread cuts the overwhelming spiciness of the sausage, creating an exquisitely layered contrast of flavours and textures. It is particularly delicious when the bread is toasted till the outer section gets crunchy and the pungent gravy of the sausage is allowed to soak in- this not only strengthens the flavour, but gives the bread a unique texture, enabling it to be slightly soggy while retaining a crunch at the same time. My sources inform me that sausage bread is best experienced accompanied by something called ‘beer’. I have not had a chance to sample this beer yet, but based on how much of it the humans in this area consume, I can only assume it is some sort of rejuvenating health drink.  The best part about sausage bread, or ‘choris pao’ as it is termed in the local tongue, is that it is found everywhere- in people’s homes, in restaurants, even on the street. If this is what street food tastes like, perhaps I should take an indefinite break from restaurants.  For now, I am more than satisfied to simply bask in the glory of this delectable work of art. In fact, I think I may never eat anything else again.